Still more Warwick Goble (22 November 1862 – 22 January 1943)

More Warwick Goble (22 November 1862 – 22 January 1943)

Warwick Goble (22 November 1862 – 22 January 1943)

How great was Gray Morrow? Pt.3

Here’s some early ’60s SF paperback stuff that I wouldn’t immediately recognize as Morrow’s work. Different, but still great.

How great was Gray Morrow? Pt. 2

How great was Gray Morrow? Pt.1

Georges Léonnec (1881 – 1940)

From Wikipedia: the brother of the novelist Félix Léonnec, began his career as a cartoonist selling drawings to newspapers in 1899. After participating in World War I he worked as an illustrator for the magazine La Vie Parisienne. He worked for several other publications including Fantasio and Le Sourire. He was also well known for his advertising illustrations for Byrrh apéritif wine, Dufayel department stores, and the Casino of Paris.

I just stumbled across the work of Stephane Rosse, and am enjoying the Hell out of it, (in spite of how little of it there seems to be on the web). The best biographical info I can find in english comes from Lambiek’s indispensable cartoonists index.  Anyone have more info on this guy? 

Sex and Death: always a winning combo. 

Édouard Chimot (26 November 1880 – 7 June 1959)

Biographical info here and here.

Sex and Death: always a winning combo. 

Édouard Chimot (26 November 1880 – 7 June 1959)

Biographical info here and here.

More illustrations by George Barbier for Laclos’ “Les Liaisons Dangereuses.” (1934)

Swiped from here.

From Wikipedia: "George Barbier (French, 1882–1932) was one of the great French illustrators of the early 20th century. Born in Nantes, France on October 10, 1882, Barbier was 29 years old when he mounted his first exhibition in 1911 and was subsequently swept to the forefront of his profession with commissions to design theatre and ballet costumes, to illustrate books, and to produce haute couturefashion illustrations. For the next 20 years Barbier led a group from the Ecole des Beaux Arts who were nicknamed by Vogue "The Knights of the Bracelet"—a tribute to their fashionable and flamboyant mannerisms and style of dress. Included in this élite circle were Bernard Boutet de Monvel and Pierre Brissaud (both of whom were Barbier’s first cousins), Paul Iribe, Georges Lepape, and Charles Martin. During his career Barbier also turned his hand to jewellery, glass and wallpaper design, wrote essays and many articles for the prestigious Gazette du bon ton. In the mid-1920s he worked with Erté to design sets and costumes for the Folies Bergère and in 1929 he wrote the introduction for Erté’s acclaimed exhibition and achieved mainstream popularity through his regular appearances inL’Illustration magazine. Barbier died in 1932 at the very pinnacle of his success."

Illustrations by George Barbier for Laclos’ “Les Liaisons Dangereuses.” (1934)

Swiped from here.

From Wikipedia: "George Barbier (French, 1882–1932) was one of the great French illustrators of the early 20th century. Born in Nantes, France on October 10, 1882, Barbier was 29 years old when he mounted his first exhibition in 1911 and was subsequently swept to the forefront of his profession with commissions to design theatre and ballet costumes, to illustrate books, and to produce haute couturefashion illustrations. For the next 20 years Barbier led a group from the Ecole des Beaux Arts who were nicknamed by Vogue "The Knights of the Bracelet"—a tribute to their fashionable and flamboyant mannerisms and style of dress. Included in this élite circle were Bernard Boutet de Monvel and Pierre Brissaud (both of whom were Barbier’s first cousins), Paul Iribe, Georges Lepape, and Charles Martin. During his career Barbier also turned his hand to jewellery, glass and wallpaper design, wrote essays and many articles for the prestigious Gazette du bon ton. In the mid-1920s he worked with Erté to design sets and costumes for the Folies Bergère and in 1929 he wrote the introduction for Erté’s acclaimed exhibition and achieved mainstream popularity through his regular appearances inL’Illustration magazine. Barbier died in 1932 at the very pinnacle of his success."

I have no idea who made this, but I love it.

I have no idea who made this, but I love it.

(via antonkamon)

More Jules Chéret (1836 – 1932) 

Bio on Wikipedia